Chanel

"Elegance is when the inside is as beautiful as the outside." - Coco Chanel

There is nothing quite as iconic as a classic Chanel tweed piece. If you've had the honor of wearing one—a jacket, a dress, a skirt—you know that its texture, its weight, and its very aura are the things magic is made of.

Beginning in 1924, Chanel enlisted a Scottish factory to produce her iconic tweed fabrics for everything from sportswear to suits and coats. She'd choose colors she was inspired by from the Scottish countryside, bringing back leaves and bits of earth to her manufacturers.

The tweed trend spread like wildfire, with a magazine image of actress Ina Claire clad in a brown tweed Chanel dress igniting the spark. The look quickly became popular throughout couture houses in Paris.

Mademoiselle Chanel switched factories in the '30s to northern France and began combining her classic tweeds with wools, silks, cottons, and even cellophane to give them a more high fashion (and lighter weight) style.

Elle